Khác biệt giữa các bản “Thành viên:Nhiêu Lộc/Sandbox”

n
không có tóm lược sửa đổi
n
n
CHINA The Cultural Revolution
{| class="wikitable"
|YEAR
|DATE
|EVENTS
|COUNTRY
|-
|1917
|October
|The October Revolution; Vladimir Lenin establishes a Communist government.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1922
|
|Joseph Stalin becomes general secretary of the Communist party.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1945
|February
|Poland’s postwar fate is decided at Yalta.
|Poland
|-
|1945
|February
|At Yalta, the Allies agree to allow the Soviets to retain positions in Eastern Europe.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1946
|February
|Hungary is declared a republic after the abolition of the monarchy.
|Hungary
|-
|1946
|November
|A Communist-dominated front takes control.
|Romania
|-
|1947
|January
|The Communist party gains control.
|Poland
|-
|1947
|August
|Elections give the Communist-dominated leftist block 46 percent of the vote.
|Hungary
|-
|1948
|May
|The Communist-dominated National Front wins an electoral victory.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1948
|June
|Soviets begin a blockade of Berlin, and Allies respond with an airlift.
|East Germany
|-
|1953
|March 5,
|Stalin dies; Nikita Khrushchev succeeds him.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1955
|May 14,
|The Warsaw Pact is formed.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1956
|June
|Strikes break out in Poznan; 57 people are killed.
|Poland
|-
|1956
|October /
 
(Timeline)
November
 
|Imre Nagy becomes prime minister; more than twenty thousand people are killed in two waves of Soviet invasions.
Main dates of the Great Chaos that began on May 6, 1966, when the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution was launched, and ended on October 6, 1976, when the Gang of Four was arrested.
|Hungary
 
|-
May 16, 1966 – The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) issues the May 16 notice announcing the start of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution
|1956
 
|November
May 25 – A big-character poster (dàzìbào in Chinese) is put up at Beijing University denouncing school leaders; sparks soon spread to other universities and secondary schools, with Red Guards spurning classes to join the revolution and vowing to "die fighting to protect Chairman Mao"
|Nagy is replaced by Janos Kadar.
 
|Hungary
August 1 – Mao Zedong supports the Red Guards in a speech to the 11th plenum of the eighth CCP Congress
|-
 
|1961
August 5 – Mao writes a dàzìbào headlined "Bomb the Headquarters"—a clear attack on State President Liu Shaoqi.
|August
 
|The Berlin Wall is erected.
August 8 – The party plenum ends with a 16-point document on the revolution setting down so-called guidelines
|East Germany
 
|-
August-November – Mao receives an estimated 11 million Red Guards from across the country on eight occasions in Tiananmen Square
|1964
 
|October
August – The Cultural Revolution condemns every form of religion and bans all open expression of faith—churches and temples are shut down and destroyed; believers are imprisoned
|Khrushchev is ousted and replaced as general secretary by Leonid Brezhnev.
 
|Soviet Union
January 1967 – Red Guards and workers seize power in Shanghai; the revolution reaches the army provoking clashes
|-
 
|1965
July 18 – Liu Shaoqi and his wife Wang Guangmei are publicly denounced; Liu is stripped of his duties weeks later and power is left in the hands of Lin Biao and Mao's wife, Jiang Qing
|July
 
|Nicolae Ceausescu becomes general secretary.
July – Insurrections erupt in big cities
|Romania
 
|-
August – The eighth Central Committee of the CCP approves the Cultural Revolution
|1968
 
|January
October 1968 – Liu is expelled from the party
|The beginning of the Prague Spring.
 
|Czechoslovakia
December – "Down to the Countryside Movement" begins with hundreds of thousands of purged cadres sent to rural areas for re-education.
|-
 
|1968
Summer 1969 – The party ratifies the overthrow of Liu, branding him a "renegade, traitor, and scab"
|March
 
|Student riots take place in Warsaw.
November 12 – Liu dies in Kaifang, Henan but the news of his death is not immediately announced
|Poland
 
|-
September 13, 1971 – Mao's designated successor, Lin, dies in a plane crash in Mongolia
|1968
 
|August 31,
April 1973 – Deng Xiaoping is rehabilitated and named vice-premier
|Soviet troops lead a Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia.
 
|Czechoslovakia
January 8, 1976 – Premier Zhou Enlai dies
|-
 
|1969
April – Hua Guofeng succeeds Zhou as premier
|March
 
|Gustav Husak becomes general secretary.
April 5 – About 2 million people gather in Tiananmen Square to protest against the Gang of Four
|Czechoslovakia
 
|-
September 9 – Mao dies
|1970
 
|December
|RiotsOctober and6 strikes occurHua inorders Polishthe coastalarrest cities;of moreGang thanof threeFour, hundredmarking arethe reportedend killed.of the Cultural Revolution
 
|Poland
June 1981 – A "resolution on several historic issues of the CCP since the founding of the People's Republic" is adopted by the party; the resolution states that Mao should shoulder "main responsibility" for the Cultural Revolution, which resulted in "the most severe setback and the heaviest losses suffered by the party and the people since the founding of the People's Republic"
|-
|1971
|May
|Erich Honecker becomes general secretary.
|East Germany
|-
|1977
|January
|Charter 77 is circulated.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1977
|August
|Miners in the Jiu Valley strike over living standards and pension cuts.
|Romania
|-
|1978
|October 16,
|Cardinal Karol Wojtyla of Krakow is elected Pope, taking the name John Paul II.
|Poland
|-
|1980
|January 15,
|Five thousand demonstrators in Prague’s Wenceslas Square commemorate Jan Palach’s suicide in 1969; Vaclav Havel and other dissidents are arrested.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1980
|August
|Eighty thousand workers take over the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk; strikes break out throughout the country.
|Poland
|-
|1980
|August 31,
|Poland’s Communist government signs agreement with strike committee in Gdansk; Solidarity era begins.
|Poland
|-
|1981
|December 13,
|Martial law is imposed; Solidarity is banned; thousands are imprisoned.
|Poland
|-
|1985
|March 11,
|Mikhail Gorbachev is named as general secretary.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1986
|March 17,
|The Communist party approves “truly revolutionary changes” in the economy.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1987
|November
|More than ten thousand people demonstrate in Brasov.
|Romania
|-
|1987
|December
|Husak is replaced by Milos Jakes.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1988
|February 26,
|More than seven hundred thousand people protest in Azerbaijan and Armenia
|Soviet Union
|-
|1988
|May/August
|Massive strikes break out across the country; on both occasions, strikers demand restoration of Solidarity.
|Poland
|-
|1989
|February 6,
|First “roundtable” meeting takes place between government and Solidarity.
|Poland
|-
|1989
|February 11,
|The government approves the creation of independent parties.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|March
|More than 75 thousand march in Budapest calling for the withdrawal of Soviet troops and free elections.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|March
|Human rights activists send an open letter of protest to Ceausescu.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|March
|In the first free elections since 1917, scores of Party officials suffer humiliating defeats.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1989
|April 1,
|Soviet troops begin to withdraw from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and East Germany.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1989
|April 7,
|Government agress to relegalize Solidarity and hold partly free elections.
|Poland
|-
|1989
|May 2,
|Hungary begins dismantling its portion of the iron curtain along its border with Austria.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|May 8,
|Janos Kadar is replaced by Karoly Grosz as general secretary.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|June 4,
|Solidarity candidates triumph in Eastern Europe’s freest elections ever held under Communist rule.
|Poland
|-
|1989
|June 16,
|Imre Nagy is reburied in a huge anti-Communist rally.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|July
|Ceausescu plays host to Warsaw Pact leaders.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|August 24,
|Tadeusz Mazowiecki is confirmed as prime minister and forms the first non-Communist government in Eastern Europe since 1948.
|Poland
|-
|1989
|September 10,
|Border with Austria is opened to East Germans wishing to leave.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|October 7,
|The Communist party dissolves itself and becomes the Socialist party.
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|October 7,
|Mikhail Gorbachev warns Honecker that “life punishes those who delay.”
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|October 9,
|Honecker’s orders for the police to shoot demonstrators are not obeyed; weekly demonstrations continue every Monday in Leipzig.
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|October 18,
|Honecker is ousted and is replaced by Egon Krenz.
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|October 23,
|Hungary declares itself “independent and legal.”
|Hungary
|-
|1989
|November 5,
|Five hundred thousand demonstrators gather inEast Berlin.
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|November 7,
|The government resigns.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|December 7,
|The government resigns.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 9,
|Tne Berlin Wall is opened; thousands of East Germans visit the West.
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|November 17,
|Anti-government demonstration in Wenceslas Square is brutally broken up by police.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 19,
|The Civic Forum is created in the Magic Lantern Theater.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 20,
|More than two hundred thousand people protest in Prague; demonstrations continue and grow daily.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 24,
|Alexander Dubcek returns to Prague; Milos Jakes and the Communist leadership resign.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 27,
|The Civic Forum directs a two-hour general strike in support of democracy.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|November 28,
|The Communist party promises to hold free elections and to abandon its “leading role.”
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|December 3,
|Egon Krenz. the Pofeburo. and the Central Committee all resign.
|East Germany
|-
|1989
|December 10,
|A new government with a non-Communist majority is formed.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1989
|December 15,
|The first demonstrations take place in Timisoara.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 17,
|Ceausescu orders the army and police to shoot demonstrators in Timisoara; thousands are killed.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 21,
|Ceausescu addresses a rally in Bucharest but is shouted down by protesters.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 22,
|Thousands of people storm government buildings in Bucharest; Ceausescu and his wife escape by helicopter.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 23,
|December 23, The National Salvation Front emerges, headed by Ion Iliescu, a former member of the Communist Central Committee.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 25,
|Ceausescu and his wife are executed.
|Romania
|-
|1989
|December 29,
|Vaclav Havel is elected president.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1990
|January 1,
|Introduction of fundamental economic reforms, securing a market system.
|Poland
|-
|1990
|January 13,
|Violent ethnic clashes break out in Azerbaijan.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|February 4,
|One hundred thousand people demonstrate against the Communist party in Moscow.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|February 7,
|Article Six of the Soviet Constitution is eliminated.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|February 24,
|The Communists are defeated in Lithuanian elections.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|March 11,
|The Timisoara Proclamation is announced.
|Romania
|-
|1990
|March 18,
|In East Germany’s first free election, 87 percent of the vote goes to pro-reunification parties.
|East Germany
|-
|1990
|March 18,
|Latvia and Estonia favor independence from the Soviet Union; Gorbachev is elected by the Soviet Parliament to a new executive presidency.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|March 25,
|Jozsef Antall of the Hungarian Democratic Forum is elected prime minister.
|Hungary
|-
|1990
|April 13,
|Gorbachev announces economic blockade of Lithuania.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|May 4,
|The Latvian Parliament votes for independence, but with an indeterminate transition period.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|June 8-9,
|The Civic Forum wins 48 percent of the vote.
|Czechoslovakia
|-
|1990
|May 20,
|Ion Iliescu of the National Salvation Front is elected president, winning 85 percent of the vote.
|Romania
|-
|1990
|May 27,
|Local elections sweep away Communist officials throughout the country.
|Poland
|-
|1990
|July 2,
|Boris Yeltsin, leader of the Russian republic and Gorbachev’s chief rival, quits the Communist party.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|October 3,
|The two Germanys are united after 45 years.
|East Germany
|-
|1990
|November 17,
|Gorbachev announces that executive power will be wielded by himself and the presidents of the 15 republics.
|Soviet Union
|-
|1990
|December 9,
|In Poland’s first free election since 1947, Lech Walesa is elected president, winning 75 percent of the vote.
|Poland
|}