Khác biệt giữa các bản “Khủng hoảng tên lửa Cuba”

Những người chỉ trích Hoa Kỳ trong đó có Seymour Melman<ref>{{cite book |first=Seymour |last=Melman |title=The Demilitarized Society: Disarmament and Conversion |publisher=Harvest House |year=1988|authorlink=Seymour Melman |location=Montreal}}</ref> và Seymour Hersh<ref>{{cite book|first=Seymour |last=Hersh |title= The Dark Side of Camelot |year=1978|authorlink=Seymour Hersh}}</ref> cho rằng Khủng hoảng tên lửa Cuba đã khuyến khích Hoa Kỳ sử dụng các phương tiện quân sự, thí dụ như trong [[Chiến tranh Việt Nam]]. Cuộc đối đầu Nga-Mỹ đồng bộ cùng lúc với [[Chiến tranh Trung-Ấn]], kể từ lúc [[Quân đội Hoa Kỳ]] tách ly quân sự chống Cuba; nhiều sử gia cho rằng việc Trung Quốc tấn công đánh Ấn Độ vì những vùng đất tranh chấp xảy ra vào cùng lúc với khủng hoảng tên lửa Cuba.<ref>{{cite web|url=http://journal.frontierindia.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=section&id=7&Itemid=53 |title=Frontier India India-China Section| quote= Note alleged connections to Cuban Missile Crisis}}</ref>
 
===PostLịch sử hậu-crisiskhủng historyhoảng===
[[Arthur Schlesinger]], một sử gia kiêm cố vấn cho Tổng thống John F. Kennedy, nói với đài phát thanh [[National Public Radio]] trong một cuộc phỏng vấn ngày 16 tháng 10 năm 2002 rằng Fidel Castro trước đó đã không muốn các tên lửa đó nhưng chính nhà lãnh đạo Khrushchev đã gây áp lực với Fidel Castro chấp nhận chúng. Chủ tịch Castro không hoàn toàn hài lòng với ý tưởng này nhưng Ban lãnh đạo Cách mạng Quốc gia Cuba đã nhận chúng để bảo vệ Cuba chống cuộc tấn công của Hoa Kỳ và cũng để giúp đồng minh Liên Xô của họ.<ref name=Ramonet/>{{rp|272}} Schlesinger tin rằng khi các tên lửa này bị tháo bỏ thì Fidel Castro tức giận với Khrushchev hơn là tức giận với Kennedy vì Khrushchev đã không hội kiến với Castro trước khi quyết định tháo bỏ chúng.<ref name=castro group=notes> Trong sách viết về cuộc đời của mình, Fidel Castro không so sánh cảm xúc của ông đối với cả hai vị lãnh đạo của hai siêu cường vào lúc đó. Tuy nhiên ông vạch rỏ rằng ông tức giận với Khrushchev vì không hỏi thăm ý kiến với ông.{Ramonet 1978}</ref>
 
InĐầu earlynăm 1992, it was confirmed that Soviet forces in Cuba had, by the time the crisis broke, received tactical nuclear warheads for their [[rocket artillery|artillery rockets]] and [[Ilyushin Il-28|Il-28 bombers]].<ref name="aca">{{cite web |url=http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2002_11/cubanmissile.asp |title=Arms Control Association: Arms Control Today}}</ref> Castro stated that he would have recommended their use if the U.S. invaded despite knowing Cuba would be destroyed.<ref name="aca"/>
[[Arthur Schlesinger]], a historian and adviser to John F. Kennedy, told [[National Public Radio]] in an interview on October 16, 2002 that Castro did not want the missiles, but that Khrushchev had pressured Castro to accept them. Castro was not completely happy with the idea but the Cuban National Directorate of the Revolution accepted them to protect Cuba against U.S. attack, and to aid its ally, the Soviet Union.<ref name=Ramonet/>{{rp|272}} Schlesinger believed that when the missiles were withdrawn, Castro was angrier with Khrushchev than he was with Kennedy because Khrushchev had not consulted Castro before deciding to remove them.<ref name=castro group=notes>In his biography, Castro does not compare his feelings for either leader at that moment, however he makes it clear that he was angry with Khrushchev for failing to consult with him.{Ramonet 1978}</ref>
 
In early 1992, it was confirmed that Soviet forces in Cuba had, by the time the crisis broke, received tactical nuclear warheads for their [[rocket artillery|artillery rockets]] and [[Ilyushin Il-28|Il-28 bombers]].<ref name="aca">{{cite web |url=http://www.armscontrol.org/act/2002_11/cubanmissile.asp |title=Arms Control Association: Arms Control Today}}</ref> Castro stated that he would have recommended their use if the U.S. invaded despite knowing Cuba would be destroyed.<ref name="aca"/>
 
[[Image:Soviet b-59 submarine.jpg|thumb|A U.S. Navy HSS-1 Seabat helicopter hovers over Soviet submarine B-59, forced to the surface by U.S. Naval forces in the Caribbean near Cuba]]Arguably the most dangerous moment in the crisis was only recognized during the Cuban Missile Crisis Havana conference in October 2002. Attended by many of the veterans of the crisis, they all learned that on October 26, 1962 the [[USS Beale (DD-471)|USS Beale]] had tracked and dropped signaling depth charges (the size of hand grenades) on the B-59, a Soviet Project 641 (NATO designation ''[[Foxtrot class submarine|Foxtrot]]'') submarine which, unknown to the U.S., was armed with a 15 kiloton nuclear torpedo. Running out of air, the Soviet submarine was surrounded by American warships and desperately needed to surface. An argument broke out among three officers on the B-59, including submarine captain Valentin Savitsky, political officer Ivan Semonovich Maslennikov, and Deputy brigade commander Second Captain [[Vasiliy Arkhipov]]. An exhausted Savitsky became furious and ordered that the nuclear torpedo on board be made combat ready. Accounts differ about whether Commander Arkhipov convinced Savitsky not to make the attack, or whether Savitsky himself finally concluded that the only reasonable choice left open to him was to come to the surface.<ref>{{cite book | last=Dobbs |first=Michael |title=One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War |publisher=Alfred A. Knopf |location=New York |year=2008 |isbn=978-1-4000-4358-3}}</ref>{{rp|303, 317}} During the conference Robert McNamara stated that nuclear war had come much closer than people had thought. Thomas Blanton, director of the National Security Archive, said, "A guy called [[Vasili Arkhipov]] saved the world."
2.136

lần sửa đổi